Brexit: Boris Johnson can't be trusted not to engage in 'low, dishonest, dirty tricks', supreme court told – live news

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including day two of the supreme court hearing to decide if Boris Johnson’s five-week suspension of parliament was lawfulLunchtime summary‘Very little time remaining’ - Summary...

Brexit: Boris Johnson can't be trusted not to engage in 'low, dishonest, dirty tricks', supreme court told – live news

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including day two of the supreme court hearing to decide if Boris Johnson’s five-week suspension of parliament was lawful

O’Neill said it would not be acceptable to have a situation where prorogation can be used for improper purposes.

The length of the prorogation is not the issue, he says. What matters is its purpose.

Earlier O’Neill said that the documents submitted by the government to the court - the memo to the prime minister on prorogation, dated 15 August, and the PM’s handwritten response of the next day - showed that “the true dominant purpose of prorogation was, as the Inner House correctly observed, to stymie parliamentary scrutiny of the executive regarding Brexit”.

He added:

Lying (albeit wholly unconvincingly) about the true reasons for exercising the prorogation power in the manner, at the time and for the period it has been exercised in this case, calls into question the lawfulness of the executive’s action.

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